Indexing Transformation: 18th of October

Dear Colleagues,

Please join our forthcoming Indexing Transformation seminar. Next week Lloyd Hill, Senior Sociology lecturer at Stellenbosch University, will be presenting a seminar titled:

‘The university centenaries: language, systemic change and institutional legacies’

Abstract:

‘University autonomy’ and the ‘autonomy of language’ are cherished notions in discourse communities that seldom intersect. The Stellenbosch centenary provides a convenient context in which to explore these ideas conjointly.  In 2018 South Africa’s three oldest universities mark centenaries – in markedly different ways. At the end of World War I the University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University were established as autonomous teaching institutions, while the University of South Africa (Unisa) was established as the nucleus of a new Pretoria-centred system of higher education accreditation. In this presentation I explore the role of languages and language ideologies as aspects of systemic change within the South African university system between 1918 and 2018. Against the backdrop of this historical narrative, I show how contradictions in the 1993-1996 Constitutional framing of the ‘language question’ underpinned the emergence of ‘medium of instruction’ as one of the key issues during the 2015–2016 student protests.

 

Date: Thursday the 18th of October

Time: 1pm – 2pm (Questions and answers until about 2.30pm)

Venue: Room 401

Address: 4th floor of the Arts and Social Sciences Building, on the corner of Merriman Avenue & Ryneveld Street.

 

Forthcoming Seminar:

Jukka Lehtonen, Senior Researcher and Professor Adjunct in Gender studies at the University of Helsinki in Finland, will be presenting a seminar titled Constructing sexual and gender diversity in education and in the educational outreach work of Finnish LGBTI human rights association Seta.

 

Abstract:

The Nordic countries, such as Finland, have often been depicted as progressive societies regarding sexual diversity and gender equality. These progressive changes in sexual minority issues, however, have not brought about radical changes in educational policies in addressing gender and sexual equality in schools. Both compulsory and upper secondary education often lack coherent protection of queer students. The same applies to specific policies on queer issues within the education system; they are hidden in the depths of many national curricula. In fact, a discrepancy exists in broader social policies supporting equality based on sexual orientation and gender diversity in the educational context.  Many LGBTI associations do educational outreach work in order to advance knowledge on sexual and gender diversity. This is necessary because educational institutions and professionals often lack the information and the tools to engage with such diversity, both in Finland and in other Nordic countries.

I will first discuss the educational policies and practices on sexualities and gender diversity currently operating in Finland. Then, I will focus on how gender and sexuality are constructed within the educational outreach work of Seta, a Finnish national LGBTI human rights association for 24 member associations. I understood Seta to trouble the current heteronormative education system by offering knowledge on sexual and gender diversity to school students, but in the presentation I reveal how also Seta’s own educational outreach work needs troubling. I will analyse curricula documents, legislation, research reports and other data from my own research projects, including ethnographic interviews, observation data, survey data, and written material.

 

Date: Tuesday the 23rd October

Time: 1pm – 2pm (Questions and answers until about 2.30pm)

Venue: Room 401

Address: 4th floor of the Arts and Social Sciences Building, on the corner of Merriman Avenue & Ryneveld Street.