Short Courses

Short Course 1

‘Evaluation and examination of postgraduate work’

Date: 10 and 11 February 2022 (10 February: 9:00 – 15:00; 11 February: 9:00 – 12:30)

Closing date for registration: 18 January 2022

Facilitation: 5 interactive Microsoft Teams sessions over 1.5 days

Costs: R 6 450 per participant

Facilitator: Prof Eli Bitzer, Centre for Higher and Adult Education, Stellenbosch University

Background and programme content:

How to effectively evaluate and examine postgraduate work remains an ongoing and debatable issue. This short course aims to equip postgraduate study supervisors and examiners at the master’s and doctorate level with relevant knowledge and skills to evaluate and examine senior degree studies. The focus will be on: How to self-assess for synergy and coherence in a study; How to assess the structural elements of a thesis; How to select examiners and submit students’ work for examination; How to apply examination criteria to different parts of a thesis; How to write the narrative of an examination report, and how to approach and conduct postgraduate oral examinations. The short course will include hands-on examination exercises applied to master’s and doctoral theses.

For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

Facilitator:

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Eli Bitzer is past Director of the Centre for Higher and Adult Education at Stellenbosch University and currently Emeritus Professor of Higher Education Studies. He has successfully supervised over 90 Master's and PhD graduates, has examined more than 50 theses and dissertations and has published extensively in the field of postgraduate supervision, doctoral education and different aspects of assessment and quality promotion in higher education. His latest co-edited book with Peter Rule and Liezel Frick (2021) is The global scholar - Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision.

DRAFT PROGRAMME: Evaluation and Examination of Postgraduate Work

Thursday, 10 February
9:00 Session 1: Introductions and welcome
  • Aims and meaning of the doctorate. Differences between master’s and doctoral studies
  • Self-assessment: How to check for synergy and coherence in a dissertation/thesis

  • 10:30 Morning break:
    11:00 Session 2:
  • Assessing the structural elements of a dissertation/thesis, selecting examiners and submitting work for examination
  • Examination criteria: Criticality about examination criteria and applying them to (a) an introduction chapter, (b) a conclusions chapter and (c) the thesis as a whole

  • 12:30 Lunch break:
    11:00 Session 3:
  • Applying examination criteria to elements of a thesis (continuation of the last topic from Session 2)

  • 15:00 Adjourn:
    Friday, 11 February
    9:00 Session 4: Writing quality examination reports
    10:30 Morning break:
    11:00 Session 5: Oral examinations (the viva vocé) – procedures and caveats
  • Question and answer session; short course evaluation

  • 12:30 Adjourn:

    Short Course 2

    Introduction to Postgraduate Supervision

    Target Group: Relatively inexperienced senior degree supervisors. The participants would typically be academic staff with doctorates who are supervising or have supervised at the master’s level but are less familiar with doctoral supervision.

    Date: 24 – 25 February 2022

    Closing date for registration: 01 February 2022

    Facilitation: Online (Microsoft Teams), consisting of 5 sessions of 1.5 hours each over 1.5 days

    Costs: R 4 850 per participant

    Facilitator: Prof Eli Bitzer, Centre for Higher and Adult Education, Stellenbosch University

    Background and programme content:

    This short course addresses five topics: (1) The ‘bigger picture’ of supervision; (2) Supervision practices; (3) Supervising the conceptualisation aspect of a study and providing feedback on submitted work; (4) The assessment of students’ work, and (5) Other important tasks of study supervisors.

    Topic 1 covers study supervision within context, including international and local trends, industrial and community relevance, the ultimate purpose of supervising senior degrees; increased group and team supervision; less face-to face supervision; more doctorates by publication; increased access and mobility restrictions; the ultimate purposes of doctoral research supervision. It also briefly addresses models of supervision, supervisor responsibilities, agreements between students and supervisors, as well as the difference between supervising at the master’s and the doctoral level.

    Topic 2 looks briefly at guiding students’ critical reading, helping them to build sound argumentation structures and promoting students’ development of their theoretical perspectives.

    Topic 3 covers how to guide doctoral candidates in developing a conceptual/theoretical framework for their study and how to provide constructive feedback on the work students submit.

    Topic 4 enquires into how supervisors can properly assess students’ work before theses/dissertations are submitted for examination as well as how to interpret doctoral examination criteria and support students’ writing and publication efforts.

    Topic 5 addresses the role of supervisors in promoting the timely and successful completion of research as well as casting an eye to students’ post-qualification and future career options and opportunities.

    (The short course is accompanied by notes and a list of useful literature sources that include books, articles and websites relevant to senior degree supervision)

    For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

    Facilitator:

    Avatar

    Eli Bitzer is past Director of the Centre for Higher and Adult Education at Stellenbosch University and currently Emeritus Professor of Higher Education Studies. He has successfully supervised over 90 Master's and PhD graduates, has examined more than 50 theses and dissertations and has published extensively in the field of postgraduate supervision, doctoral education and different aspects of assessment and quality promotion in higher education. His latest co-edited book with Peter Rule and Liezel Frick (2021) is The global scholar - Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision.

    DRAFT PROGRAMME: Introduction to Postgraduate Supervision

    Thursday, 24 February
    9:00 – 10:30 Topic 1: The ‘bigger picture’ of doctoral supervision
    10:30 – 11:00 Morning break:
    11:00 – 12:30 Topic 2: Some supervision practices I
  • Helping students to build sound arguments
  • Guiding students’ literature perspectives

  • 12:30 – 13:30 Lunch break:
    13:30 – 15:00 Topic 3: Some supervision practices II
  • Guiding students in the development of a conceptual framework
  • Providing constructive feedback on students’ work

  • 15:00 Adjourn:
    Friday, 25 February
    9:00 – 10:30 Topic 4: Assessment and evaluation of doctoral work
  • Checking for quality and coherence in a thesis/dissertation prior to examination
  • Examining of doctoral work

  • 10:30 – 11:00 Morning break:
    11:00 – 12:30 Topic 5: ‘Other’ important tasks of doctoral supervisors
  • Managing timely and successful doctoral completions
  • ‘An eye on the future’ – promoting graduates’ future career options

  • 12:30 Participant feedback and end of workshop

    Short Course 3

    Writing for Publication (Introductory)

    Date: 1 – 4 March 2022

    Closing date for registration: 18 February 2022

    Facilitation: Interactive Microsoft Teams sessions over 4 days

    Costs: R 6 300 per participant

    Facilitator: Dr Rose Richards

    Background and programme content:

    The programme is aimed at novice authors who want to publish single- or multi-authored articles from their dissertations, theses or research projects. The programme covers four topics.

    Topic 1 addresses the aim and requirements of a scholarly article, where to start, reporting and discussing research results as well as some organising techniques. Topic 2 deals with the introduction, body and conclusion sections of an article and possible ‘writing recipes’ to deal with literature and creating argumentative flow. Topic 3 covers some specifics such as sound paragraphing, writing an abstract and finer detail, while Topic 4 provides guidelines on revising and polishing an article, stylistic issues, maintaining momentum in your writing and dealing with reviewer feedback.

    For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

    Facilitator:

    Avatar

    Dr Rose Richards, heading the Unit for English Writing at the Language Centre, Stellenbosch University (SU). She has published extensively in the field of language, writing and higher education and have facilitated numerous writing for academic purposes workshops for over more than 15 years. Dr Richards are supported by critical readers and advisers from the SU Language Centre. The short course will be presented via Microsoft Teams.

    DRAFT PROGRAMME: Writing for Publication (Introductory)

    Tuesday, 01 March
    9:00 Brief introduction and welcome (Prof Eli Bitzer)
    9:15 Session 1, Getting started: What is an academic article? Where to start? Organising techniques (Dr Richards)
    10:30 Break
    11:30 Session 1 continues: Parts of the article: Overview of sections; Material and methods; Results; Discussion.
    13:00 End of Session 1
    14:00 Individual writing and consultations
    16:30 End of Day 1
    Wednesday, 02 March
    9:00 Session 2, Introduction and conclusion: Purpose; Possible writing recipes
    10:30 Tea Break
    11:30 Session 2 continues: Using literature, purpose, challenges, ethics.
    13:00 End of Session 2
    14:00 Individual writing and consultations
    16:30 End of Day 2
    Thursday, 03 March
    9:00 Session 3, Creating flow: Paragraphing
    10:30 Tea Break
    11:30 Session 3 continues: Abstracts, purpose, nature, techniques.
    13:00 End of Session 3
    14:00 Individual writing and consultations
    16:30 End of Day 3
    Friday, 04 March
    9:00 Session 4, Revising and polishing: Revision strategies, style, sentences.
    10:30 Tea Break
    11:30 Session 4 continues: Maintaining momentum and dealing with reviewer feedback.
    13:00 End of Session 4
    14:00 Individual writing and consultations
    16:30 End of Day 4 and short course

    Short Course 4

    Writing for Publication (Advanced)

    Date: 28 March – 14 April 2022

    Closing date for registration: 9 March 2022

    Facilitation: Interactive electronic writing and feedback sessions over 14 days

    Costs: R 8 650 per participant

    Critical readers and language editors: Prof Eli Bitzer, Dr Vincent Bosman, Ms Ella Belcher and Ms Sanri Theron.

    Background and programme content:

    This short course provides the structure (guidance, feedback from critical readers and from language editors) and sufficient writing space over a period of two weeks to complete an article for publication. It involves dedicated and concentrated writing time and interaction among authors, critical readers and language editors to complete and finalise an academic article for submission to an accredited scholarly journal.

    Participation rules:

  • To participate in this short course a person needs to be a relatively experienced and seasoned author.
  • The participant needs to provide the organisers with the ‘guidelines for publication’ in the accredited journal in which (s)he plans to publish, as well as with an example of a well-written article from the targeted journal.
  • The participant needs a draft article based on own research. The article should be approximately 70% (plus) complete and all data procedures should have been completed, otherwise it might not be possible to meet the completion target during the two-week writing period.
  • The writing pace will be largely determined by individual participants, but the timeline below will more or less be followed.

    For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

    Critical readers and language editors:

    Avatar

    Prof Bitzer is past Director of the Centre for Higher and Adult Education and Emeritus Professor of Higher Education at Stellenbosch University (SU). He has successfully supervised more than 90 Master's and PhD graduates, has examined over 50 senior studies and has published extensively in the field of postgraduate supervision, doctoral education and different aspects of assessment and quality promotion in higher education. His latest publication as co-editor with Peter Rule and Liezel Frick (2021) is ‘The global scholar - Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision’ and he has participated in the National Review of the Doctorate in South Africa in 2020/21.

    Avatar

    Dr Bosman is an experienced researcher, postgraduate supervisor and examiner interested in and contributing to the proper theorisation and conceptualisation of senior degree studies. His most recent work as senior academic, who has retired from full-time teaching in higher education, include teaching at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and presenting on conceptual frameworks in the Doctoral Research Training Programme at Stellenbosch University’s School of Business. His most recent article is: Liberating the oppressed consciousness of preservice teachers through critically reflective praxis: Educational research for social change. He is currently also doing the training and development evaluation reports for the HIV/AIDS Unit at UWC. His interest is in the development of theories/conceptual frameworks as lenses for sense-making, also of own lived experiences.

    Avatar

    Ms Belcher and Theron are accredited and highly experienced professional language editors who have edited many articles, books, theses and dissertations for authors and students alike. They regularly contribute to writing retreats and academic writing retreats and have built a sound reputation for thoroughness and accuracy in their work.

    WRITING TIMELINE: Writing for Publication (Advanced)

    28 March: Introduction of participants and facilitators. Sharing information on writing guidelines with participants. Explanation of procedures for participation. This involves an MS-Teams session from 9:00 to 10:30 and more information on the session will follow.
    29 March: Participants submit a draft introductory part of the article. Critical readers provide feedback to participants on article introductions.
    31 March: Participants write and submit a draft of the main body of the article to critical readers.
    4 April: Critical readers provide feedback to participants on the main body of the article.
    6 April: Participants submit a draft conclusions part of the article to critical readers and receive feedback.
    8 April: Participants submit the full article to critical readers and finalise the article by adding the abstract, keywords and reference list. Critical readers provide feedback on the completed article.
    11 April: Participants submit the full article to language editors for language editing. The short curse ends, but communication between participants and language editors continue for a maximum of one week (up to 18 April) until the article is ready for submission to a targeted journal.

    Short Course 5

    Supervising research paradigms

    Target Group:All senior degree supervisors across all fields of research and studies wherein research paradigms play an important role. The participants would typically be academic staff with doctorates who are supervising master’s and/or doctoral students.

    Date: 21 – 22 April 2022

    Closing date for registration: 1 April 2022

    Facilitation: Online (Microsoft Teams), consisting of 5 sessions of 1.5 hours each over 1.5 days

    Costs: R 4 850 per participant

    Facilitators: Dr Vincent Bosman and Prof Eli Bitzer.

    Background and programme content:

    The course aims to equip higher degree supervisors, mainly those in economic sciences, social sciences and humanities, with knowledge and skills to guide higher degree students through the paradigmatic assumptions and their implications in senior degree studies.

    The main issues addressed are: (a) Why paradigmatic assumptions, and explicating them, are important in senior degree studies; (b) A typology of the most prominent research paradigms, their differences and implications; (c) Examples of studies where paradigmatic assumptions are clarified and employed for different parts of a study; (d) Why study supervisors need paradigmatic versatility to supervise different types of studies in their field of research; (e) The implications of ignoring or neglecting epistemological, ontological, methodological and axiological assumptions in a study.

    For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

    Facilitators:

    Avatar

    Dr Bosman is an experienced researcher, postgraduate supervisor and examiner interested in and contributing to the proper theorisation and conceptualisation of senior degree studies. His most recent work as senior academic, who has retired from full-time teaching in higher education, include teaching at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and presenting on conceptual frameworks in the Doctoral Research Training Programme at Stellenbosch University’s School of Business. His most recent article is: Liberating the oppressed consciousness of preservice teachers through critically reflective praxis: Educational research for social change. He is currently also doing the training and development evaluation reports for the HIV/AIDS Unit at UWC. His interest is in the development of theories/conceptual frameworks as lenses for sense-making, also of own lived experiences.

    Avatar

    Prof Bitzer is past Director of the Centre for Higher and Adult Education and Emeritus Professor of Higher Education at Stellenbosch University (SU). He has successfully supervised more than 90 Master's and PhD graduates, has examined over 50 senior studies and has published extensively in the field of postgraduate supervision, doctoral education and different aspects of assessment and quality promotion in higher education. His latest publication as co-editor with Peter Rule and Liezel Frick (2021) is ‘The global scholar - Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision’ and he has participated in the National Review of the Doctorate in South Africa in 2020/21.

    Short Course 6

    Supervising conceptual frameworks

    Target Group: All senior degree supervisors across all fields of research and studies wherein conceptual frameworks and advanced conceptual capabilities play an important role. The participants would typically be academic staff with doctorates who are supervising master’s and/or doctoral students.

    Date: 5 – 6 May 2022

    Closing date for registration: 11 April 2022

    Facilitation: Online (Microsoft Teams), consisting of 5 sessions of 1.5 hours each over 1.5 days

    Costs: R 4 850 per participant

    Facilitator: Dr Vincent Bosman and Prof Eli Bitzer.

    Background and programme content:

    Many senior degree students battle to get to a decent conceptual framework for their studies. Often, also, less experienced supervisors are not able to assist or not be clear on how to guide a student towards such a framework. Absence of a sound conceptual framework leads to a weakly or under-theorised study - often with bad consequences for candidates.

    In most fields of inquiry conceptual frameworks guide research projects. Such frameworks thus serve as thinking tools that impact on all aspects of a study. In their excellent book (2012): Reason and Rigor – How conceptual frameworks guide research, Sharon Ravitch and Matthew Riggan explain eloquently how and why conceptual frameworks play such an important part in senior degree research.

    Reality is always more complex than any theory or model can completely capture. The ‘slice of reality’ that the researcher works in and with is, in most cases, contextually sensitive. Researchers thus need to construct tools that take account of such complexity and avoid oversimplification. Conceptual frameworks thus serve as lenses, most useful when they incorporate complementary theories that promote the theoretical understanding of phenomena or research issues under scrutiny.

    Conceptual frameworks are not simply an assortment of ideas and theoretical perspectives. The elements of a conceptual framework should relate to one another to exhibit coherence, thus contributing to a strong main argument for any study. Such an argument needs to be developed and clearly communicated to readers and examiners to justify why thát understanding, and nothing else, provides the best approach for the study or research project. And, importantly, how it informs research questions and guides the researcher’s methodological decisions.

    This unique short course provides guidelines to senior degree supervisors on why conceptual frameworks are important, how the construction of a conceptual framework can be guided and, most importantly, how they assist senior degree students to produce sound, scholarly work.

    For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

    Facilitators:

    Avatar

    Dr Bosman is an experienced researcher, postgraduate supervisor and examiner interested in and contributing to the proper theorisation and conceptualisation of senior degree studies. His most recent work as senior academic, who has retired from full-time teaching in higher education, include teaching at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and presenting on conceptual frameworks in the Doctoral Research Training Programme at Stellenbosch University’s School of Business. His most recent article is: Liberating the oppressed consciousness of preservice teachers through critically reflective praxis: Educational research for social change. He is currently also doing the training and development evaluation reports for the HIV/AIDS Unit at UWC. His interest is in the development of theories/conceptual frameworks as lenses for sense-making, also of own lived experiences.

    Avatar

    Prof Bitzer is past Director of the Centre for Higher and Adult Education and Emeritus Professor of Higher Education at Stellenbosch University (SU). He has successfully supervised more than 90 Master's and PhD graduates, has examined over 50 senior studies and has published extensively in the field of postgraduate supervision, doctoral education and different aspects of assessment and quality promotion in higher education. His latest publication as co-editor with Peter Rule and Liezel Frick (2021) is ‘The global scholar - Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision’ and he has participated in the National Review of the Doctorate in South Africa in 2020/21.

    DRAFT PROGRAMME: Supervising Conceptual Frameworks

    Thursday, 5 May
    9:00 – 10:30 Introduction and orientation (Prof Eli Bitzer)
  • What is a conceptual framework and what purposes does it serve? (Prof Eli Bitzer)
  • How do conceptual frameworks come about? The role of reading and literature (Dr Vincent Bosman)

  • 10:30 – 11:00 Morning break:
    11:00 – 12:30
  • Where does the conceptual framework feature in a (doctoral) study? (Prof Eli Bitzer)
  • An account of how a conceptual framework evolved in one study and how it grounded the study (Dr Vincent Bosman)

  • 12:30 Lunch break:
    Afternoon No presentations during this time.
  • Activity 1: Working individually or in pairs/groups to draft/develop/refine an own conceptual framework or providing guidelines for the development of a CF.
  • Friday, 6 May
    9:00 – 10:30
  • Feedback and discussion on Activity 1: Participants present their conceptual frameworks or their own supervisory guidelines for guiding students in the development of a CF
  • Activity 2: Individual activity on the use/application of supervision guidelines for developing/employing a conceptual framework in an own or a student’s study

  • 10:30 – 11:00 Morning break:
    11:00 – 12:30
  • The doctorate: How do conceptual frameworks demonstrate ‘doctorateness’? The link between the conceptual framework and conceptual conclusions (Prof Eli Bitzer)
  • Wrapping up the topic and planning for future/follow-up work (Dr Vincent Bosman)
  • Invitation to evaluate the short course

  • 12:30 Short Course ends

    Short Course 7

    Supervising literature reviews

    Target Group: All senior degree supervisors across all fields of research and studies where literature reviews play an essential role. The participants would typically be less experienced academic staff with doctorates who are currently supervising master’s and/or doctoral students.

    Date: 2 – 3 June 2022

    Closing date for registration: 11 May 2022

    Facilitation: Online (Microsoft Teams), consisting of 5 sessions of 1.5 hours each over 1.5 days

    Costs: R 4 850 per participant

    Facilitator: Prof Eli Bitzer and Dr Vincent Bosman.

    Background and programme content:

    Many senior degree students often battle to arrive at a decent literature review in their field of inquiry that might result in sound theoretical perspectives for their research and studies. Sometimes novice supervisors may also not be able to guide students in writing a good literature review. Questions that arise might include:

  • What are the purposes of literature reviews?
  • What role do literature reviews play in the different stages of a study (such as the proposal stage, initial research stages, more advanced stages and towards the end of a study)?
  • What literature should be included or omitted from literature reviews?
  • Does a literature review only cover one chapter or more chapters?
  • What are the criteria for a good literature review?
  • What outcomes should or could result from a literature review?
  • What are the typical strengths and weaknesses of literature reviews?
  • How to guide students on getting started on a literature review?

  • Most senior degree studies, if not all, require literature reviews prior to and during the course of study as a key step in the research process or as part of developing a sound basis for their research methodology. For novice researchers such actions are often seen as a difficult undertaking that demands a complex range of skills. These include acquiring the skills of literature searching and retrieval, determining knowledge gaps, defining topics for exploration, developing a conceptual framework, developing sound methodology for a study, developing the ability to relate to literature and discuss findings from a study as well as to draw on literature to discuss the conclusions of a study. How to write a proper literature review, while at the same time adhering to scholarly and argumentative principles, might also provide for becoming adept at writing and reporting - often within a limited time scale. To advise on and guide such activities might also provide challenges for novice supervisors or study promoters. This focused short course will offer guidelines to early career senior degree supervisors (and their candidates) on why literature reviews are important, how they can be planned and written and, most importantly, how they can guide senior degree studies towards sound scholarly contributions worthy of being awarded such a degree.

    For registration enquiries, contact the short course administrator: Ms Rhoda Van Rensburg at vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

    Facilitators:

    Avatar

    Prof Bitzer is past Director of the Centre for Higher and Adult Education and Emeritus Professor of Higher Education at Stellenbosch University (SU). He has successfully supervised more than 90 Master's and PhD graduates, has examined over 50 senior studies and has published extensively in the field of postgraduate supervision, doctoral education and different aspects of assessment and quality promotion in higher education. His latest publication as co-editor with Peter Rule and Liezel Frick (2021) is ‘The global scholar - Implications for postgraduate studies and supervision’ and he has participated in the National Review of the Doctorate in South Africa in 2020/21.

    Avatar

    Dr Bosman is an experienced researcher, postgraduate supervisor and examiner interested in and contributing to the proper theorisation and conceptualisation of senior degree studies. His most recent work as senior academic, who has retired from full-time teaching in higher education, include teaching at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and presenting on conceptual frameworks in the Doctoral Research Training Programme at Stellenbosch University’s School of Business. His most recent article is: Liberating the oppressed consciousness of preservice teachers through critically reflective praxis: Educational research for social change. He is currently also doing the training and development evaluation reports for the HIV/AIDS Unit at UWC. His interest is in the development of theories/conceptual frameworks as lenses for sense-making, also of own lived experiences.

    DRAFT PROGRAMME: Supervising Literature Reviews

    Thursday, 2 June
    9:00 – 10:30 Topic 1: Literature in senior degree studies and their supervision (Prof Eli Bitzer)
  • Where does literature fit into the senior study process? The ‘magic circle’
  • Citizens of ‘three worlds’ – the implications of research ‘citizenship’
  • ‘Coming to the (authorial) party’ – metaphors for engaging with literature
  • Is engaging the literature different for master’s and doctoral studies?

  • 10:30 – 11:00 Morning break:
    11:00 – 12:30 Topic 2: Types of literature reviews, its purposes and components (Dr Vincent Bosman)
  • What common types of literature reviews are/can be used by students?
  • What are the general purposes of literature reviews?
  • What would be the typical components of a literature review?
  • An overall ‘concentric model’ to relate to the literature review process

  • 12:30 Lunch break:
    13:30 – 15:00 Topic 3: From the literature review to theoretical perspectives – paradigmatic, theoretical and methodological considerations (Prof Eli Bitzer and Dr Vincent Bosman)
  • What role does paradigmatic choices (the ‘lens’ through which knowledge is viewed), theoretical contexts (the ‘angle’ taken in positioning the study) and methodological choices (the ‘how’ of the research) play in selecting, engaging with and reporting literature in a study?
  • How could supervisors advise their students on these issues?
  • Attending to the pre-course questions asked and concerns raised

  • 15:00 Individual task for Day 2:
  • In preparation for Day 2 of the short course, sample literature review chapters from three completed theses (one master’s and two PhDs) will be provided. Participants will critique these chapters along the lines of a few questions that will be supplied.

  • End of Day 1
    Friday, 3 June
    9:00 – 10:30 Topic 4: Critical assessment and evaluation of a literature review chapter (Dr Vincent Bosman)
  • Feedback from participants on overnight task
  • Discussing the value and applicability of self-assessment of literature reviews
  • What do examiners say about literature chapters?
  • The overall use of literature in studies to generate theoretical perspectives and constructing theoretical/ conceptual frameworks

  • 10:30 – 11:00 Morning break:
    11:00 – 12:30 Topic 5: Positioning and aligning the literature review within a research project (Prof Eli Bitzer and Dr Vincent Bosman)
  • How do supervisors ensure that their research students adhere to lines of argumentation, particularly when employing literature? Does engaging the literature require a particular style of writing and communication?
  • How does the supervisor get (new) students started on literature reviews and how does one ‘wean’ students towards research independence later in a study (especially re the use of literature)?
  • How do we keep students to research agreements – especially when it comes to working the literature?

  • 12:30 Participant feedback and end of Short Course.

    General Enquiries:

    Should you require more information on the learning outcomes, programme or information on modules, or if you would like to complete an application form, please get in touch with the Centre for Higher and Adult Education at the following address:

    The Secretary and Course Administrator - Ms Rhoda van Rensburg
    Centre for Higher and Adult Education
    Faculty of Education
    University of Stellenbosch
    Private Bag X1
    Matieland
    7602

    Phone: + 27 (0)21 808 2277/78/94
    Fax: +27 (0)21 808 2270
    Email: vanrensburgrhoda@sun.ac.za

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