Theses

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Assessing the sustainable infrastructure of a low carbon community: case study of the Lynedoch ecovillage.

Sharne Bloem
Publication: University of Stellenbosch
2019 - Theses

Urban areas are responsible for 70% of global CO2 emissions and the rapid growth in urbanisation presents a significant risk to cities. It is predicted that by 2030 more than 70% of the South African population will be living in cities.



Addressing community energy challenges with utility scale renewables: A case study of Hopefield Wind Farm.

Kyle Swartz
Publication: University of Stellenbosch
2019 - Theses

This thesis documents how a utility-scale renewable energy project has addressed community energy challenges through the development of a wind farm as part of South Africa’s Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP).



The Development Impact of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme on South Africa’s Small Towns.

Jeeten Morar
Publication: University of Stellenbosch
2019 - Theses

This thesis aims to explore how effective economic development efforts in the Renewable Energy Independent Power Produce Programme (REIPPPP) have been at creating long term improvements in the livelihood of low income communities.



Does the South African renewable energy programme exclude black woman owned businesses?

Fezeka Nobuntu Stuurman
Publication: University of Stellenbosch
2018 - Theses

The main aims of this thesis were to investigate and critically evaluate the participation of Black women owned businesses (BWOBs) within the South African Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP), and to make recommendations to improve levels of participation of Black women in the REIPPPP in future rounds of the programme.



Understanding Social Ecological Regime Shifts: The case of woody encroachment in South Africa.

Luvuno, L.
Publication:
2019 - Theses

Humanity has been very successful in modifying the planet to meet the demands of a rapidly growing human population. The dissertation emphasises the importance of understanding the social and ecological interactions that underlie woody encroachment, including the worldviews of land users and managers.